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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
comes hard. >> host: over the past couple of years, we've seen google and facebook and their washington offices grow exponentially. >> guest: right. >> host: we did an interview with the executive vice president of samsung earlier here at ces, and he mentioned that they have one person in washington. um, would you recommend to a panasonic, to a sony that they beef up or keep their washington offices strong? >> guest: well, you know, microsoft didn't have much of a washington office until all of a sudden the feds came after them on antitrust issues. and then you get the justice department going after you on something else, and then you get the sec on something else, then congress passes some law, and your whole business plan's out the window. they recognize -- i mean, it's unfortunate companies need that. but the reality today there are so many conflicting interests that somebody if they have an advantage in washington will write the rules to benefit them. and that can undo your business plan. so, yeah, i'd say to sony -- these companies come out of countries that don't have that kind of
on the internet or google it. in all my years working on the pacific islands, that story of the old blind woman is important. it made me appreciate the overwhelming importance of the knowledge of older people throughout human history. we have the knowledgeable to people that spells the difference between life and death of the entire society. those are the ways in which older people are useful in traditional society. they contribute and the societies treat them well as elderly. the other set of reasons for variation of treatment of the elderly is the society's cultural values, which is done independently as the usefulness of the the elderly. for example, centralized government that have had governments for years, east asia has the philosophy of confucius and his doctrine. it means obedience and respect and support for elderly parents. cultural values that emphasize value to older people contrast the status of the elderly in the united states. older americans are at a disadvantage in getting jobs. for example, a sociologist carried out the experiment of committing dozens of job applications in re
difficulty. and the stories of people being sold inappropriate investments, you can go do a google search and again to you, you will find hundreds of stuff like on one page. >> host: you didn't say anything about the quality of the new. a good steak at least? aspect apparently the advice is, is to give that the food when, after the presentation. and partly so people aren't listening to you over clanking force, in part because they're not distracted. that my experience was it left a lot of hungry people. so i am sitting there waiting and waiting and waiting there and they kept saying oh, the kitchen is delayed. the kitchen is delayed. the kitchen is delayed. and the salmon was fun to i wouldn't describe it as four-star. there's a whole third of what kind of restaurant you should go to come and it should be a good restaurant. it's not low wind. nobody is taking you to chipotle, but on the other hand, it's not going to be too high and. chances are it's not going to be the palm. and then there are things about the different types of food. one person i interviewed for the book told me that a g
, it's getting to me. what we find out about a new chinese tax up off of google earth as opposed to a traditional process come you have to raise the question of how much we see the types of things we need to see. that doesn't get to the question of human, what networks we have on the ground, how we work with allies who are concerned but i think the best analogy that most of our allies in the asia-pacific hurt concerned with front yard and their front door of a to the street in intersection, they're not concerned about the troll and intersection. they want to make sure no one comes in around eight and it's a problem because we have presumptions that a lot of the reasons we had the treaty with japan, were not worried about an amphibious aid in japan. it's hard to drive the mayor. so that's the type of things that need to focus on, which goes towards building a community of interest we can leverage another race. >> are going to wrap things up. let me take my colleagues of you and the rest arrested at the policy series. we've got health care on tuesday, economic realities and priorit
say that i am glad that google was founded by an immigrant. it's worth noting that none of the founders of these companies came to the united states because of their skills. andy grove, they all came here for our family system or because they were refugees of the children of refugees. what made that special was the traits they shared with immigrants of all kinds. entrepreneurs, and a desire for a better life. it is the secret sauce that makes america great. when alexander hamilton and andrew carnegie, and many others, immigration is good for our country. it's time that we do our part and devise a way that the people have enough get up and go to get up and go and come to our shores and bring their talents and contributions to our society and to our economy to become americans with us. thank you very much, mr. chairman. i yield the floor back. >> i think the gentleman. without objection from all other members will be made a part of the record. we will turn now to our distinguished panel of witnesses. i will begin by introducing the first panel. our first witness on this pa
includes the internet, gps, google, the iphone and god, what would you do about that? i expect we hear more examples from the witnesses and we can probably spend our two hour hearing reading a list. and yet, i feared some of my colleagues in congress would still be unimpressed. we will still hear arguments that the federal government's role should be restricted to basic research base the private sector can do the rest alone. that, everybody, has to take a cut. that is the 8.2% cuts looming on march 1st [inaudible] i happen to believe personally that we can invest in unemployment and food stamps, or with can invest -- to e limb the needs. so let me attempt to briefly effort some of the arguments. r&d is not simple. linear process from basked to applied to developmented and so on to a final commercial product, it doesn't go in only one distribution. rtd is part of a complex innovation process with -- [inaudible] there's no clear line at which the public role ends and the private role begins. and there's not been any my of our lifetimes. that's why partnerships between the public sector namely
is amazon, google, microsoft, apple. those are the exceptions. the rule is mostly small businesses. small businesses that are in powering small businesses. we haven't traditionally had a seat at that table and some of our goals is to be a part of the process so that we can engage as we have in the past. that is why we are here. >> hello. how is everybody doing today? i am from detroit michigan. i spent most of my day working on something called grand canyon university and what we do is help on to the jurors and start-ups to be able to leverage the technology to be able to tell their stories online. so, this gives you a little background about me to it i had the opportunity to be a part of latin america for the new silicon valley, and what that really did is it opened up my eyes to this whole startup ecosystem and how the world really works so the perspectives i want to bring today is how does the city and thus the kind of change their mind set from an industrial perspective? i'm from detroit michigan and if you look at detroit, it has changed. how does a town that has historically been a
a new chinese attack sub, or ballistic missile site, often google earth as opposed to a traditional process. you have to raise the question of just how much we are releasing the types of things we need to see. that doesn't and get to the question of human, what type of networks we have on the ground, how we are working with our allies who are also very concerned with, i think the best analogy is that most of our allies in the asia-pacific are concerned with their front yard. and their front door. and when they get out to the streets and intersections, that's what they want the u.s. to police. they're not concerned about the current the intersection industry. i want to make sure no one comes inside their own gate. it's a problem because we have presumptions that a lot of the reasons we have, for example, the treaty with japan. we are not worried about an amphibious invasion of japan. we want japan to take a more active role in the intersection. so that's the type of thing we need to focus on i think for that intelligence which goes towards building the community interest that we can
but there it is yahoo! or google or e day, intel, who didn't come into this country through the highly skilled immigrant program that other means of immigration into gave an interview november 20 at on the publication of the school of business very distinguished school in pennsylvania where you stated i was in new york in the 1960's as a child and being in america is quite an experience. i left in the late 60's but i always wanted to come back. the first chance i got was 1980 mcfate when my father got transferred to the consulate in new york city. would you agree based on your own experiences here in america that the notion of family unification of the usenet has been and should continue to be an enjoyable part of what we do as it relates to comprehensive immigration to the estimate the only thing i've been arguing is 120 double or even triple because we want to bring in additional talent that can heal the economy and help us take advantage of this technology that i talked about >> you are right the children immigrants go further than their parents difficult. >> there's been this economy that's been pre
is as an engineer. if you google it, it is problem- solving. i came to washington to solve problems. unfortunately, as the problems have gotten bigger, congress has gotten smaller. not smaller in size or ego, but smaller in the ability to get things done. we are pulled in one direction or the other, we have to do this for our party or for this group or that group. what we need is for all of you to help us by reaching out to your representatives and tell them to join with us, and join with no labels. tell your representative to become a problem solver. it will give your representatives the incentive to join us and come together because in the end, we have to work together for our country to solve these problems. it is only going to have been not just because the 25 of us get together, but because the american people say we need to get things solved. we need you to solve them. this is not just up to us, it is up to every single person in this group. [applause] >> there is something important that happened here this morning. the semi you are represented here today, when they identified themselves, th
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)